Germany to reject impending EU burning ban

Germany will not accept European Union plans to ban combustion vehicles from 2035, it has been learned.

Speaking at an event hosted by German industry association BDI earlier this week and reported by Automotive NewsGerman Finance Minister Christian Lindner said there would continue to be niches for combustion engines, so a ban was a mistake.

European lawmakers previously voted in favor of the measure that requires automakers to cut carbon dioxide emissions by 100% by the middle of the next decade, effectively banning the sale of combustion engine cars. This also includes those powered by synthetic fuels.

The EU wants to ban sales of combustion vehicles by 2035, but Germany hasn't.

Michael Sohn/AP

The EU wants to ban sales of combustion vehicles by 2035, but Germany hasn’t.

Last June, German Transport Minister Volker Wissing said the country wanted to “shape the transformation in a technologically open way.

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“This includes registering new cars beyond 2035 if they are powered exclusively with synthetic fuels in a climate-neutral way.”

Porsche is working hard on synthetic fuels to keep its combustion engines alive.

Damien O’Carroll / Stuff

Porsche is working hard on synthetic fuels to keep its combustion engines alive.

Synthetic fuels, or e-fuels, are either refined from plants or made using basic chemical processes and electricity. If the electricity is produced from renewable sources, such as wind or solar, then the fuels are considered “climate neutral” because their combustion releases only the amount of carbon into the atmosphere that was previously eliminated.

Lindner went on to say that Germany will continue to be a leader in electric vehicle sales as well as production.

Italy is another country requesting an exemption from the ban, at least temporarily. Ecological Transition Minister Roberto Cingolani said last year: “These cars need very special technology and they need batteries for the transition.”

Italy also wants an exemption from the ban, at least until it gets its battery factories up and running.

Provided

Italy also wants an exemption from the ban, at least until it gets its battery factories up and running.

“An important step is that Italy becomes self-sufficient in the production of high-performance batteries and that is why we are now launching the giga-factory program to set up a very large-scale battery production facility in Italy.”

Italy is still in favor of phasing out combustion engines as a general rule, but Cingolani said discussions were underway with the European Commission on how the new rules would apply to automakers like Ferrari and Lamborghini which sell a much lower number of vehicles than more. consumer manufacturers. After all, a half-million dollar Ferrari supercar produces less CO2 than the ten SUVs you could buy for the same price…

France is also resisting the European Union’s 2035 ban date, instead demanding a more lenient end-of-decade target, longer for plug-in hybrid models.

Kevin A. Perras